Indonesian army ready to aid RP vs Abu kidnappers

The Indonesian Military as quoted in the Jakarta Post is ready to assist the Philippine military in launching  an operation against Abu Sayyaf militants who have hijacked two Indonesian vessels and kidnapped 10 Indonesian crewmen.
The Indonesian forces are  ready for the hostage rescue operation, the newspaper quoted Defense Minister Ryamizard Ryacudu, who added that  Jakarta would have to first wait for Manila’s request as the incident occurred in Philippine territory.
The army has prepared vessels to conduct the operation in case the Philippine authorities allow Indonesian forces to join the operation, he said. He also has coordinated with the Philippine defense minister to address the incident.
“It’s a foreign country. If we are not allowed to enter then we cannot force it. If Manila is ready to settle it themselves, then we’ll wait, but if they need help, then we should enter,” Ryamizard said on Tuesday.
Insp. Gen. Anton Charliyan said the National Police are ready to deploy the elite Densus 88 counterterrorism squad and the Mobile Brigade to take part in the operation. The police had coordinated with Interpol in an attempt to save the crewmen.
But the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) said Indonesian military and police can’t help in search efforts for abducted seafarers
Indonesian security forces  cannot help in the ongoing search-and-rescue operations for its 10 nationals who were reportedly kidnapped by Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG) bandits while passing off Tawi-Tawi over the weekend, the AFP stressed.
“Per our Constitution, we do not allow military forces here without a treaty,” AFP spokesman Brig. Gen. Restituto Padilla said.
He was referring to Article XVIII, Section 25 of the 1987 Constitution which explicitly prohibits foreign military bases in the Philippines.
It also states that “foreign military bases, troops, or facilities shall not be allowed in the Philippines except under a treaty duly concurred in by the Senate and, when the Congress so requires, ratified by a majority of the votes cast by the people in a national referendum held for that purpose, and recognized as a treaty by the other contracting State.”
Padilla made this   statement after Indonesia offered the use of its military and police units in tracking down the bandits and its captive nationals.
He also said the AFP is quite capable of locating and rescuing the victims.
The victims were aboard the Brahma-12, also an Indonesian-owned tugboat, along with a sister vessel, was towing a barge laden with 7,000 tons of coal, when allegedly attacked by the bandits over the weekend.
It was en route from Puting river in Banjarmasin in Indonesia’s South Kalimantan province to the Batangas in the Philippines.
Local authorities found Brahma-12 abandoned off Languyan Island, Tawi-Tawi on Monday afternoon.
The Indonesian army has prepared vessels to conduct the operation in case the Philippine authorities allow Indonesian forces to join the operation, Ryamizard said. He also has coordinated with the Philippine defense minister to address the incident.
In a statement, Abu Sayyaf has demanded 50 million pesos in ransom, equal to P 14.2 billion (US$1.07 million). Responding to this, Ryamizard said that Indonesia should not meet the demand.

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